Articles
 
8th Wisconsin: The “Old Abe” Regiment
by Ann Andersson
January 15th, 2012
 
The Eighth Regiment was organized at Camp Randall, Madison, and its muster into the United States service completed on the 13th of September, 1861, and on the 12th of October, it left the State for St. Louis. Arriving at St. Louis on the 14th of October,
 
“Just Retribution,” the Federal Burning of Prentiss, Mississippi, September 1862
by Chris Wehner
June 29th, 2011
 
Summer of 1862 Brig. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis’s Army of the Southwest reached Helena, Arkansas, on July 12, after a grueling and toilsome march.
 
Supplier to the Confederacy: Isaac Campbell & Co, London
by Ann Andersson
January 14th, 2011
 
The story of Jewish entrepreneur Samuel Isaac and his founding of the commission house of S. Isaac, Campbell & Co in London in the 1850s.
 
Into Rebeldom: How the Physical Journey South Impacted Union Soldiers
by Chris Wehner
November 29th, 2009
 
According to historian Aaron Sheehan-Dean the study of the Civil War soldier is best achieved when focused on the “interconnections” of “motivation, experience, and effect.”
 
Confederate Correspondent Book Review
by David Poremba
October 23rd, 2009
 
lucid account of the "Bloody Fourth".
 
Book Review Commanding Lincoln's Navy
by David Poremba
August 1st, 2009
 
A welcome addition to the literature on the United States Navy's role in the Civil War is Dr. Taaffee's Commanding Lincoln's Navy. This is a well-written overview of naval operations from the perspective of the leadership of the Union Navy and the problem
 
Book Review - The Baltimore Plot
by David Poremba
August 1st, 2009
 
Louis Wigfall and James Seddon, along with Maryland's Governor Thomas Hicks, wanted Lincoln dead and the District of Columbia in Confederate hands; and finally, Otis Hillard, Cypriano Fellandini, and John Wilkes Booth, native Baltimorean, always in the ba
 
Book Review: The Judas Field
by Caleb Klingler
June 10th, 2009
 
In Howard Bahr’s latest novel, The Judas Field, he continues his popular theme of a Confederate soldier retelling harrowing experiences of the American Civil War. Each of first two popular titles, The Black Flower and The Year of Jubilo, narrates a soldie
 
A Wisconsin Yankee in Confederate Bayou Country
by David Poremba
May 25th, 2009
 
Butler, he saw as an incompetent political general serving solely for personal gain and covering up the incompetence of other officers. Williams he hated with a passion, describing him as an “imbecile, drunken, malignant, cowardly, traitorous blockhead” -
 
Mutiny At Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans
by David Poremba
May 2nd, 2009
 
The story of the fall of New Orleans in May of 1862 has been not much more of a Civil War footnote, overshadowed by the Vicksburg campaign occurring the following year – with the exception perhaps, of the attention given to General Benjamin “Beast” Butler
 
Union - Troops Furnished and Deaths
by Soldier Studies Article
March 16th, 2009
 
Data on loss of Union soldiers, state to state, and type of death.
 
Civil War Tactics
by Soldier Studies Article
March 8th, 2009
 
Tactics is the military art of maneuvering troops on the field of battle to achieve victory in combat. 'Offensive tactics" seek success through attacking; "defensive tactics" aim at defeating enemy attacks.
 
The Art of War (Machiavelli, Vauban, and Frederick )
by Soldier Studies Article
March 8th, 2009
 
Civil War Implications of Tactics By Dr. Ernest Butner
 
Caring for the Men: The History of Civil War Medicine
by Soldier Studies Article
March 8th, 2009
 
When the war began, the United States Army medical staff consisted of only the surgeon general, thirty surgeons, and eighty-three assistant surgeons.
 
Civil War Pensions
by Soldier Studies Article
March 8th, 2009
 
At the close of the Revolutionary War, the United States government began administering a limited pension system to soldiers wounded during active military service or veterans and their widows pleading dire Poverty.
 
IN SEARCH OF A SOUTHERN MANIFEST DESTINY: Sibley's Brigade - The Confederate Army of New Mexico
by Robert Thompson
March 1st, 2009
 
In early 1862, the Confederate Army of New Mexico invaded the New Mexico Territory in an attempt to secure the American West for the Confederacy, but nothing was gained but misery and suffering for the soldiers of the army.
 
Company E
by Caleb Klingler
February 28th, 2009
 
The American Civil War proved to be the most violent and catastrophic events in American History. Historians are only beginning to understand fully the horror of the Civil War battlefields.
 
Master of War: The Life of General George H. Thomas
by David Poremba
February 28th, 2009
 
In this delightful romp through Civil War generals’, politicians and modern historians reputations, Benson Bobrick marches to the front rank the life of General George H. Thomas.
 

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